Stockton Early College Academy's Premiere News Center

Wolves' Chronicle

Celebrating a Legend

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Yesterday, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day was celebrated all across the United States. This holiday celebrates the birth of one of America’s greatest rights activists.

Martin Luther King, Jr. was born on January 15, 1926, and would soon become famous for his huge advancements in the civil rights movement. His holiday is celebrated the third Monday of every January. King organized nonviolent protests that combated the segregation and racial discrimination of African Americans in the US. In order to get his message across, King used nonviolent practices that featured the use of civil disobedience, such as marches and protests. One of the main things King is known for is his famous “I Have a Dream” speech, which was delivered during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom in 1963. A year later, King would receive a Nobel Peace Prize for his peaceful protests.
Towards the end of his career as a speaker and activist, King began to fight for economic justice. He organized the “Poor People’s Campaign,” a campaign that would target social issues and poverty in 1968. He is viewed by many as a hero.

“Martin Luther King Jr. was one of the most inspirational people there was, he stood up for his beliefs,” Kim Tran (9) said.

At the age of 39, on April 4th, 1968, King was assassinated at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee. Many of King’s supporters fought to make his birthday a national holiday, but it was opposed by many US representatives. It wouldn’t be until the year 1983 that president Ronald Reagan would pass a bill that made King’s birthday a federal holiday. The first time this holiday would be officially celebrated would be on January 20, 1986. Although King’s birthday was declared a federal holiday, some states refused to recognize the holiday as its own entity. Some states combined the day with other holidays, or gave it alternate names. The holiday was finally celebrated properly across the nation in 2000. Many are happy he finally got the holiday he deserved.

“He deserved a holiday of his own because he was one of the few men who stood up for the rights of African Americans, he bettered the community,” Tierra Bradley (10) said.

Words of Wisdom - Shown above is the plaque that is inscribed upon the Martin Luther King Jr. statue. The statue was created as a part of the Stockton public art program in 2004.

Words of Wisdom – Shown above is the plaque that is inscribed upon the Martin Luther King Jr. statue. The statue was created as a part of the Stockton public art program in 2004.

 

If anyone is interested in paying their respects to Martin Luther King Jr, they can visit the Martin Luther King Jr Plaza located at the Stockton Civic Center.

 

 

 

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Celebrating a Legend

    Features

    2017’s Solar Eclipse

  • Features

    Key to Volunteering

  • Features

    Views on Cyberbullying

  • Celebrating a Legend

    Features

    2017’s Solar Eclipse

  • Celebrating a Legend

    Top Stories

    Tutorial: How to play videos on the yearbook!

  • Clubs

    From Law and Society, to Mock Trial: Learn About These Two Students’ 4-Year Journey

  • Celebrating a Legend

    Clubs

    Wits in World War 2: Academic Decathlon

  • Celebrating a Legend

    Student Life

    Get Ballin’

  • Celebrating a Legend

    Top Stories

    Your Typical SECA All Nighter: With a Twist

  • Celebrating a Legend

    Top Stories

    Exploring by the Bay

Stockton Early College Academy's Premiere News Center
Celebrating a Legend