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2017’s Solar Eclipse

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On August 21st, 2017, North America witnessed a solar eclipse. For many states, the eclipse was partial, while some states like Tennessee and Oregon were in a path of totality (full coverage). A solar eclipse is defined as the event in which the moon passes directly between the earth and the sun. The last time this happened was February 6th of 1979. Since an event like this has not happened in a long time, many students were very enthusiastic about witnessing the event.

“Some kids had those pinhole viewers, and it was really cool to see the little crescent shape the eclipse formed. It looked like a sideways smile,” Mersadez Oller (12) said.

 

Playing with Light – Jazzmin Medina (12) holds a pinhole viewer Ms. Chaddock provided to some of her students. The pinhole viewer was made using two blank index cards, one of which had a small hole pierced through it. “I had to figure out what position to hold it in, so it took a few tries before I actually got it to work,” Medina said.

 

Despite all the excitement, students had to take precaution when watching the eclipse. Looking directly at the eclipse for more than a second could have caused severe retinal damage, and even blindness. Students were able to look only through the use of special glasses and welding masks. Some schools were actually provided with glasses of their own. Weber high school’s principal bought eclipse glasses for all students, while Van Buren elementary was selling glasses for only fifty-cents.

 

A Sight for Sore Eyes – Adelisa Creighton (12) and Esteban Aceves (10) take turns looking at the eclipse through special glasses. The glasses belonged to Dre Vang (10) who bought them from his sisters school, Van Buren Elementary. “It was cool to be able to look at the eclipse without worrying about burning my eyes out,” Creighton said.

 

Some students were unable to witness the eclipse. Many SECA teachers and college professors requested that students were to stay inside during the event.

“Our teacher didn’t let us go outside, for our own protection since looking directly at it would damage our eyesight. So I was a bit disappointed because I wanted to see the eclipse, but I respect our teacher’s decision since it was for our own good,” Madeline Furtado (9) said.

Some students were generally uninterested in the event. Many expected a bit more from the eclipse, but were let down due to partial coverage. They even thought of it as more of a distraction to completing their work.

“I heard a lot of people say it was disappointing, so I thought that I might as well just stay here and finish my work,” Rivelle Jauregui (12) said.

For any students, parents, or staff that are interested, instructor Russel Lewis filmed a livestream of the eclipse, and it can be seen on the San Joaquin County of Education’s youtube page (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vB3yDleAdRA). The United States will witness another solar eclipse on April 8th, 2024 in early spring. This article will be updated with more exclusive images.

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Stockton Early College Academy's Premiere News Center
2017’s Solar Eclipse